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A programme of studies related to India and indian values

A Programme of Studies Related to
India and Indian values

The chronology of events of Indian history is very complex, and our history books often present this chronology in such a way as to render a synoptic view of Indian history extremely difficult. In any case, our textbooks fail to present to our students a connected story of the development of essential ideas and movements which are directly related to the values which need to be underlined.

A study of Indian history should be encouraged among all teacher-trainees, as one of the central aims of education is to provide to every student irrespective of whether he wants to be a doctor or an engineer, an artist or a scientist, a writer or an artisan, should become a true Indian and should receive from his teacher, whatever his speciality, that great heritage of Indian culture to which he is a natural heir. This would mean that all teachers, whether their specialisation is in the field of mathematics or language, in science or literature, in home- science or physical culture, should have the necessary equipment which would enable them to transmit Indianness to the children and students who would be placed under their care. This does not mean that every teacher should be a specialist in Indian history but he should have at least a sound and authentic idea of Indian culture and of those achievements which fill us with pride in our heritage.

Therefore, the aim should be to provide to teacher-trainees a bird’s eye view of Indian history and some

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A programme of studies related to India and indian values

detailed idea of some of the great movements and events as also of inspiring biographies, not only of kings and queens, but also of our great builders of religion and spirituality, of philosophy and ethics, of language and literature, science and technology, of art, of music and dance and sculpture and architecture. In addition, a brief idea of the various aspects of Indian life and of the values which are embedded in arts and crafts, in music and dance, in festivals and in the general attitude relating to the ultimate aims of life which provide a clue to the enigma of the continuity of Indian culture and to the problems of building up a greater and more glorious cultural edifice for the Indian people should be provided.

Finally, a somewhat detailed account of the story of the freedom struggle which constitutes our immediate past which presents us with a record of an unusual stirring of the Indian spirit which has thrown up large waves of ideas and motives which seem destined to guide India’s course towards the future should also be included.

This would show the need for a new model of the presentation of Indian history. What exactly should be a new model is an extremely important question, and it calls for a special treatment at the hands of experts. In practical terms, a few important lines on which a programme of the study of Indian history should be envisaged as an integral part of the teachers’ training programme, is outlined:

A Rapid View of Indian History
Part I

(i)         The question of India’s antiquity

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A programme of studies related to India and indian values
  1. Mohenjodaro and Harappa 
  2. Upanishad; Ramayana and Mahabharata
  3. Vasistha, Vishwamtira, Lopamudra, Yajnavalkya, Maitreyi

Part II

  1. Buddha and Mahavira
  2. Buddhism and Jainism
  3. Invasion of Alexander the Great
  4. Chandragupta Maurya
  5. Ashoka

 

III

 

  1. Kushans and Kanishka
  2. Chandragupta, Samundragupta and Vikramaditya
  3. Gupta Period: the Golden Age of India
  4. Kalidasa, Varahamihira, Aryabhatt, Brahmgupta
  5. Fa-Hieun’s account of India

IV

 

  1. Harsha Vardhana
  2. Huen Tasang’s account of India

V

  1. The coming of Islam, Tenets of Islam
  2. Succession of Sultans, Razia Begum

VI

  1. Babar’s account of India
  2. Beginnings of Sikhism: Guru Nanak
  3. Akbar
  4. Abul Fazal, Faizi and Tansen
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A programme of studies related to India and indian values
  • Jahangir, Shahjahan and Aurangzeb
  • Great Saints: Narsi Mehta, Tulsidas, Meerabai, Surdas, Chaitanya, Tukaram
  • Establishment of Khalsa: Guru Gobind Singh
  • Vijay Nagar
  • Annals of Rajputana
  • Rana Pratap
  • The rise of Maratha Power
  • Shivaji
  • Sufism

VII

  1. Arrival of Europeans in India. East India Company
  2. Conflict and chaos of the 18th century

VIII

  1. Triumph of the British over Rivals in India
  2. War of Independence of 1857
  3. Rani Lakshmibai, Nanasaheb and Tope

IX

  1. Renaissance in India and struggle for Freedom
  2. Raja Ram Mohun Roy, Dayananda, Ramakrishna, Vivekananda
  3. Birth of Indian National Congress
  4. The first demand, The Moderates: Ferozshah Mehta, Ranade and Gokhale
  5. The demand of the Nationalists: Swarajya as the goal
  6. Tilak and Sri Aurobindo
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A programme of studies related to India and indian values
  1. The Mantra of Bande Matram
  2. Birth of new literature, art and science
  3. Bankim Chandra, Jagdish Chandra Bose, Rabindranath Tagore
  4. The Revolutionaries
  5. The coming of Gandhi
  6. The role of Annie Beasent
  7. Jalianwala Bagh
  8. Chittranjan Dass
  9. Gandhi, Motilal Nehru, Jawaharlal Nehru
  10. Political ideology of Satyagraha
  11. Non-cooperation and Awakening of Masses
  12. New leaders emerge
  13. Jawaharlal Nehru, Rajendra Prasad, Maulana Azad, Vallabbhai Patel, C.Rajagopalachari
  14. Declaration of the goal of Complete Independence
  15. Jail experience of eminent leaders
  16. Gandhi and Jinnah
  17. Gandhi and British Viceroys
  18. Gandhi and Subhash Chandra Bose
  19. Gandhi and his constructive programme
  20. Freedom struggle becomes a mass movement
  21. Role of women in the freedom struggle
  22. New Constitution of 1935
  23. Congress leaders join the government
  24. Congress leaders withdraw from the government
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A programme of studies related to India and indian values
  1. The British repression. Problems of communal disharmony. Churning of Indian masses
  2. Second World War and India
  3. Cripps proposals
  4. Rejection of Cripps proposals and Quit India Movement
  5. Subhash Chandra Bose and Indian national Army
  6. Defeat of the Axis Powers and the End of the Second World War
  7. Attlee and Mountbatten
  8. Acceptance of the tragic proposal of Partition
  9. 15th August 1947 Birth of Free India

15th August 1947: Sri Aurobindo’s 75th Birthday: Sri Aurobindo’s message on the birth of Free India.

X

  1. Jawaharlal Nehru and Free India
  2. The new Constitution of India 1949
  3. India adopts Planning
  4. Problems of contemporary India
  1. National integration
  2. Poverty and unemployment
  3. Politics, economics and morality
  4. Power and productivity
  5. Integrated rural development
  6. India and her neighbours
  7. India’s educational policy
  8. India and the world
  9. New cultural awakening
  10. Science and spirituality
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A programme of studies related to India and indian values
  1. An in-depth study of one of the greatest heroes of Indian history
  2. Indian heroism and the ideal of the conquest of truth

6.   Indian Festivals:

  1. An in-depth study of one of the festivals of India
  2. Festivals of India and national integration
  3. Festivals and daily life in India

7.   Indian Sports and Games:

  1. Place of physical culture
  2. An in-depth study of Yogic Asanas and their relationship with physical health and higher fulfillment
  3. An in-depth study of one of the indigenous games and sports of India
  4. Modern India and the world of sports

8.   The Theme of Perennial India:

  1. The greatness of India and continuity of Indian culture
  2. A diagnosis of the weakness of contemporary India
  3. How to build new India
  4. India and the ideal of human unity

Part III

An in-depth study of the one of the following themes:

  1. Tolerance and synthesis in Indian culture
  2. Unity and diversity of India
  3. Remedy of India’s social evils
  4. Synthesis of democracy and socialism in the Indian context
  5. The contemporary Indian youth:      His aspirations
  6. The young India’s cultural efflorescence
  7. India and new paths of progress
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